Coronavirus SARS-CoV1 infection (SARS)

Essential Evidence

Last Updated on 2021-03-10 © 2021 John Wiley & Sons, Inc.

Printer Friendly

Authors:
M. Joyce Green, MD, Assistant Professor, Penn State Health Hershey Medical Center
Pete Yunyongying, MD, FACP, Associate Professor , Carle-Illinois College of Medicine, University of Illinois
Mark H. Ebell, MD, MS, Professor, College of Public Health, University of Georgia
Mindy A. Smith, MD, MS, Clinical Professor, Department of Family Medicine, Michigan State University

Editor:
Mark H. Ebell, MD, MS, Professor, College of Public Health, University of Georgia

Overall Bottom Line

  • The most common presenting symptoms of the SARS-CoV1 in 2003 were fever, chills, myalgia, malaise, and cough. 1 Test patients for SARS-CoV1 using PCR only if no other cause of pneumonia can be found 72 hours after starting a workup and if the patient has risk factors for SARS-CoV1. Consult public health authorities prior to testing. G5C
  • Supportive care is the mainstay of treatment. Although most patients were treated with corticosteroids and antivirals, there is little evidence that these interventions improved outcomes, and they are known to have ill effects. C 2
  • The case fatality ratio in over 8000 cases reported by the WHO in 2003 was 9.6%. G18C
  • A separate chapter address infection with SARS-CoV2 and COVID-19.

Prognosis

Bottom Line

  • Increasing age and the presence of comorbid conditions appear to be the most important prognostic factors for SARS-Cov1. 12B
  • The case fatality ratio in over 8000 SARS-Cov1 cases reported by the WHO in 2003 was 9.6%. G18C
  • Anti–SARS-Cov1 coronavirus antibodies were not detected in patients 6 years after infection, but T-cell responses were still present, raising questions about the outcomes of re-infected patients. C 5