Coronavirus SARS-CoV1 infection (SARS)

Essential Evidence

Last Updated on 2021-03-10 © 2021 John Wiley & Sons, Inc.

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Authors:
M. Joyce Green, MD, Assistant Professor, Penn State Health Hershey Medical Center
Pete Yunyongying, MD, FACP, Associate Professor , Carle-Illinois College of Medicine, University of Illinois
Mark H. Ebell, MD, MS, Professor, College of Public Health, University of Georgia
Mindy A. Smith, MD, MS, Clinical Professor, Department of Family Medicine, Michigan State University

Editor:
Mark H. Ebell, MD, MS, Professor, College of Public Health, University of Georgia

Overall Bottom Line

  • The most common presenting symptoms of the SARS-CoV1 in 2003 were fever, chills, myalgia, malaise, and cough. 1 Test patients for SARS-CoV1 using PCR only if no other cause of pneumonia can be found 72 hours after starting a workup and if the patient has risk factors for SARS-CoV1. Consult public health authorities prior to testing. G5C
  • Supportive care is the mainstay of treatment. Although most patients were treated with corticosteroids and antivirals, there is little evidence that these interventions improved outcomes, and they are known to have ill effects. C 2
  • The case fatality ratio in over 8000 cases reported by the WHO in 2003 was 9.6%. G18C
  • A separate chapter address infection with SARS-CoV2 and COVID-19.

EBMG Audio

Recovery from pneumonia

Acute stage of pneumonia

Tables

Table 1: CDC Recommendations for Surveillance for SARS.

Patients who are hospitalized for pneumonia or acute respiratory distress syndrome without an identifiable cause AND have one of the following:
  • Travel to mainland China, Hong Kong or Taiwan, or close contact with an ill person with a history of recent travel to one of those areas
  • Employment in an occupation associated with a risk for SARS-CoV exposure
  • Part of a cluster of cases of atypical pneumonia without an alternative diagnosis

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